A dialogue about “likes” between me and Jane

She says:

I do not like pushing the “like button” on WordPress.

What are people “liking?” I often wonder if they are reading the blogs.  We are stuck with this new phenomena.  People write beautiful blogs. I prefer to comment from now on.”

Me:

Such a synchronicity:

You took the words from my mouth. What is this “like” about really? Like is no real feedback, it is a false confirmation which brings in fact no real benefit neither to the reader or the writer.

We are yapping through everything, don´t we?…- so it is again a perfect expression for sloth, apathy, ultimately, a way of showing an “interested” unconcern and fear of commitment.

For the record, I received a message from WordPress saying that 3rd of July was my best day for “likes”.
Aha, good…and so damn what…? Frankly, does it really bring me any benefit?…

Do these “likes” feed me?

Shall we have some “likes” for dinner tonight, maybe…? And for desert some sweet emoticons on a bed of polite indifference.

  https://julienmatei.com/2012/06/30/please-take-a-moment-and-comment/

About julienmatei
I feel an inner urge to express what I see, to communicate and share with others all these impressions. Often the things I see are there, not yet manifest, but waiting... to be observed, talked about, and embraced. These new insights need another approach, a more vivid curiosity... Due to fear and prejudice we prefer to see only "the official" truth - but THE OFFICIAL TRUTH IS DEAD - being dead, it has nothing to give... We can continue pretending Death is fascinating or... we can take the trouble to LIVE... THE NEW has no definition yet... Again, IT requires another "perception", the courage to apprehend everything differently, from a totally new angle, with new confidence and inquisitive touch. This blog is not about interesting concepts, it is about participation... finding new solutions, inspiration, togetherness.

13 Responses to A dialogue about “likes” between me and Jane

  1. goldennuggetde says:

    You just got my like on that topic 🙂

    But ya, I agree. Although I only give a like if I’ve really read the whole posting.

    There’s an easy way to stop it: you can drop this button somewhere within the basic settings of wordpress. How about that?

    Richard

  2. julienmatei says:

    Well, the whole discussion is in fact not about “liking” or not liking. It is like playing tennis:

    The writer tosses the ball, the reader sends the ball back through saying a word. Yes- as you know – a single word can be the start to many things…Pressing the like button, feels kind of impersonal.

    Is it possible to get rid of “like” button you say?

  3. Tracie Louise says:

    Then I won’t “like” your post.. I will comment instead. I understand what you are saying and on some level I do agree. But I would rather someone take a second to hit the “like” button than not to do anything at all. Just like everything else in life it’s all a matter of perspective… you can choose to see the “like” button as cold and impersonal and lacking any true significance… or you can choose (as I do) to see it as a positive thing, an acknowledgement of a job well done, or just a sign of validation. Glass half empty… glass half full, kinda stuff. Totally up to you I guess.

  4. julienmatei says:

    You see, I don intend to be right! I don´t expect you to agree with me. I just make my point.

    “The real” validation and acknowledgement create a flow of energy, which in its turn, create even more “happy events”.
    A “like” doesn´t have that energy, apart from a mental virtual satisfaction.
    As you know, we have all become masters of virtual reality. Modern man fears contact, fears real commitment, he suffers of the misconception that he “doesn´t have time”. And so he takes “the easiest way”
    I got many likes – it is nice to see that my texts have been appreciated BUT WHAT REALLY COUNTED were the shorter or longer comments, which were incredibly rewarding and forward-pointing.

  5. boomiebol says:

    I like to acknowledge my reading the post, considering i follow quite many posts and i want to get to them all but i can’t always comment. other times, i really dont have anything to say because it has probably been said already or depending on what the post is….i dont want my comment to be inappropriate (i read a poem yesterday, it was a poem someone had written after she lost her teenage son). I didn’t want to belittle her pain with my words no matter how sincere they might have been…often times posts stay with me throughout the day or week even if i don’t comment…

    • julienmatei says:

      I also know what you mean Boomiebol. You read a poem which touches you, what can you comment….?
      On the other hand, I think you never belittle someones pain, as long as you talk from the heart, as you feel you need to say smth. Who knows, maybe that person needs your words…

      • boomiebol says:

        I never thought of it that way. I am usually very careful and extra senstive with my comments…but i see what you mean.

  6. julienmatei says:

    I send you what my friend Jane´s point of view:

    Not only does the like button lack originality, but overuse of the “like” button also threatens our engagement with information online and in real life. When we compose a comment, we are compelled to actually think about why we feel a need to respond to an image or message. Liking a post “allows us to bypass this thought process.” It is all the sentiment without the thought, the online equivalent of the conversational “that’s nice” that we sometimes halfheartedly throw out when we are not really listening.

  7. livvy1234 says:

    No, the like button does not offer me the ability to “chew, swallow, and digest.” What is the point of collecting “likes?” Like “what?” What was “liked?”

    • julienmatei says:

      That is exactly what I say:

      What is the point of collecting “likes” really…? What energy does it create…? NAUGHT…

      • livvy1234 says:

        To examine the like button from all angles, requires a disciplined mind. We have been confronted with the like button. What shall we do about it?

  8. julienmatei says:

    The only thing to be aware of is: WHAT CREATES A REAL BENEFIT?

    The like button is of course a consequence of a long series of fleeing REALITY into nothingness.
    We no longer recognize VALUE, contact, cocreation, at the end of the day, we give a shit about the other…

    “Like” is a way of faking togetherness.

    We have to redifine REALITY. We have to redefine Humanity. WHAT IS REAL…?

    • livvy1234 says:

      I am working on all of this, too. “What is real?”

      1. Suffering is real.
      2. Sickness is real.
      3. Death is real.
      4. Duality is real.
      5. Our life is fading away every instant.
      6. Delusion and greed are built into the nature of humankind.

      Dainin Kategiri: “For century after century, consciously or unconsciously, human beings have depended on toys. Since birth we’ve all had toys – cameras, tape recorders, video tapes, phiosophy, psychology and even religion. Everything through which we try to satisfy our desires becomes a toy.”

      I agree. “Like” is a form of superficiality. Liking a post on a blog or a comment on facebook does not offer genuineness in communication in the virtual world. The tone of my words, how my heart is built into what I write or do not write – conveys some sense of my feelings – which can be misconstrued, of course. But in the misconstruing is the chance to for both parties to listen deeply, reframe perspectives, come to a conclusion, relate, touch, feel. Pushing the “like” button offers me nothing.

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