If we are to heal ourselves, we have to ask what our spontaneous, healthy child wants

Quoting James Hollis

Personality, or personhood as Jung might define it, is not found in adjustment to external expectations, but in serving one’s calling in the context of our environment. This may bring one to an individual experience of being misjudged, derided, tortured, and crucified.

No wonder vocation is seldom served. And yet, and yet, something in us always knows better. Something in us, no matter how much we flee it, summons us. We may avoid it all our lives, but deep down, something knows. It knows us whether we wish to know it or not. There is no escape from this knowing though much of contemporary Western culture is a flight from knowing what, inescapably, we already know.

We will be most nearly real when we serve our vocation. We will not be spared suffering, but we will be granted a deeply felt sense that our life is right, even when suffering isolation and rejection.

That deeply felt sense of what is right for us… is how we can find it is we are to do with this precious and fragile gift of life and transcendent reality we are summoned to serve. This sacrifice of the ego will constitute our greatest gift to the world.

The sacrifice of collective acceptance, which individuation demands, is redeemed by our bringing a larger person back to the world, to our relationships and to our dialogue with mystery.

Courtesy of Monica Hassani

Escaping from what we already know

Yes, she knew, yet she vehemently refused to admit she knew…She was afraid to confront and assume her own insight.

I made this observation some time ago.

So, this following quote by James Hollis is about the same thing:

“There is no escape from Knowing though much of contemporary Western culture is a flight from knowing what, inescapably, we already know.”

To put it plainly,
WE KNOW BUT DON´T WANT TO KNOW WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW.

Is this perplexing cowardice or sheer insanity?